Here There and Everywhere

Expat wanderer

Saving the Lives of Malnourished Children

I received this e-mail this morning:

Hi there,

My organization, International Medical Corps, has the ability to save the lives
of malnourished children around the world and we just received some very
exciting news. We have been nominated to be one of the Top 25 in American
Express’ Projects, “Saving the Lives of Malnourished Children.” Our project was
chosen out of 1,190 projects and is now eligible to receive up to $1.5 million
to help feed hungry children. Because your blog, here there and Everywhere, has
a loyal following, I thought this would be an issue you would want to share with
your readers. I’ve put together this microsite explaining everything.

http://internationalmedicalcorps.smnr.us/

If you could post about this on your blog it would really help to spread the
message and potentially could save many lives. At the minimum, please vote for
“Saving the Lives of Malnourished Children.” Please let me know either way.
Thanks.

Chessia


Chessia Kelley, International Medical Corps
ckelley@imcworldwide.org
http://imcworldwide.org

I googled the organization and it is legitimate. Here is what Wikipedia has to say:

International Medical Corps (known also as IMC) is a global humanitarian nonprofit organization established by volunteer doctors and nurses. The organization provides disaster relief, delivers health care to underserved regions, builds clinics, and trains local health care workers with the goal of creating self-reliant, self-sustaining medical services and infrastructure in places where that had previously been lacking.

IMC’s focuses include primary and secondary health care, prevention and treatment of infectious diseases such as malaria, cholera, dysentery, and HIV/AIDS, supplemental food for malnourished children, clean water and hygiene education, mental health and psychosocial care, and microfinance programs that allow people to earn their own income.

International Medical Corps is a founding member of the ONE Campaign and a member of the Clinton Global Initiative.

September 19, 2008 - Posted by | Bureaucracy, Fund Raising, Health Issues, Interconnected, Living Conditions, Social Issues

15 Comments »

  1. I used to work for IMC, and I ca tell you they are the real thing. The do amazing work in very difficult places.

    Comment by Alanna | September 19, 2008 | Reply

  2. Alanna – My husband and I have supported Doctors without Borders for many years, and I had not heard of International Medical Corps before I got this e-mail. Thank you for your verification, and oh-by-the-way, I really really like your blog and the things you have to say about working in an international assistance environment. It takes a special blend of compassion and tough mindedness to be a Damsel in Success!

    Comment by intlxpatr | September 20, 2008 | Reply

  3. Doctors Without Borders is a great group, too.(and they have their own planes, which always made me jealous at IMC) They focus on immediate crisis response, and they move on once the situation is stabilized. IMC stays for rebuilding, too. It’s a difference in philosophy, and I think both ways have their virtues.

    Comment by Alanna | September 20, 2008 | Reply

  4. It sounds as if they are complementary, Alanna, not competitive. God knows there is room in this tormented world for a whole lot of medical assistance. O remember when MSF (DWB) were the only ones who would go in to handle the outbreak of Ebola several years ago.

    Comment by intlxpatr | September 20, 2008 | Reply

  5. […] Saving the Lives of Malnourished Children via Here There and Everywhere […]

    Pingback by Thank You for Blogging About International Medical Corps! < Chris Abraham | September 24, 2008 | Reply

  6. […] Saving the Lives of Malnourished Children via Here There and Everywhere […]

    Pingback by Thank You for Blogging about International Medical Corps! « Chris Abraham’s Weblog | September 24, 2008 | Reply

  7. […] Saving the Lives of Malnourished Children via Here There and Everywhere […]

    Pingback by My Blog » Blog Archive » Thank You for Blogging about International Medical Corps! | September 24, 2008 | Reply

  8. Doctors Without Borders is a great group, too.(and they have their own planes, which always made me jealous at IMC) They focus on immediate crisis response, and they move on once the situation is stabilized. IMC stays for rebuilding, too. It’s a difference in philosophy, and I think both ways have their virtues.

    Comment by Juri | September 25, 2008 | Reply

  9. […] Saving the Lives of Malnourished Children via Here There and Everywhere […]

    Pingback by Thank You International Medical Corps Bloggers « International Medical Corps | September 28, 2008 | Reply

  10. Hey, thanks so much for writing about IMC! With your help, and that of your readers, IMC made it to the top 5! Now all vote tallies reset to zero, so its important that we all vote again before Oct. 14 in order to get the 1.5 million for nutrition programs. As your readers noted, IMC helps to rebuild communities, meaning that that much money goes a long way. If you could vote again or repost that would be amazing! I am writing a new social media news release and will be sending it out to everyone this week. Thanks again!
    http://www.membersproject.com/project/view/ozh1p1

    Comment by Chessia | September 30, 2008 | Reply

  11. […] Saving the Lives of Malnourished Children via Here There and Everywhere. […]

    Pingback by Thank You All Who Supported International Medical Corps! < Chris Abraham | October 15, 2008 | Reply

  12. […] Saving the Lives of Malnourished Children via Here There and Everywhere. […]

    Pingback by Thank You All Who Supported International Medical Corps! « Chris Abraham’s Weblog | October 16, 2008 | Reply

  13. […] Saving the Lives of Malnourished Children via Here There and Everywhere. […]

    Pingback by Thank You All Who Supported International Medical Corps! « International Medical Corps | October 16, 2008 | Reply


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