Here There and Everywhere

Expat wanderer

Breakfast at the Beirut Restaurant, Suq al Waqif, Doha

“We want to take you for breakfast at the Beirut!” my friend said with enthusiasm, and I was shocked. She is totally covered. How could we eat at the Beirut? I remember her family loves the Beirut, and I remember lining up with all the other cars along Shar’aa al Karaba’a to buy felafel and foul and hummos, yes, oh yes, such good felafel. But it wasn’t really a place for ladies, especially covered ladies and their daughters.

As is usual with this friend, I never really have the complete picture. When my niece and I go to pick up my friend and her daughter, it is actually my friend and three daughters and we squeeze into my car and head – not to Karaba’a, but to the Suq al Waqif!

When I go to park in one of the new, tiny, narrow little parking spots, my friend laughs and says “You park like an American! I am going to show you how to park like us!” and she points to the one tree off in an unpaved area, and sure enough, there is one spot, not in the shade of the tree but in the shade of a large truck parked in the shade of the tree. “Now you are learning to park like we do!” she laughs, and I laugh too, I am always learning something from this friend.

We walk a short distance and she leads me into a restaurant which on the outside says Matam Beiroot, but it’s in Arabic. If you are walking from the upper parking lot, it is one of the very first buildings you come to, at the top of the street.

Inside, there are all kinds of tables and chairs, but my friend and her daughters lead us upstairs to the family section, where we sit off in the corner, so she and her daughters can sit with their backs to other customers while we eat. We are a strange group, two women covered head to toe, two younger girls in hijab, my blue-eyed-blonde niece and me, laughing and enjoying each other so much in the corner.

Since then, I have been back many times. The Beirut is a lot of fun for breakfast. They have wonderful felafel, and several different great hummos, and they have beans and the ubiquitous french fries, and tea. Grammy and I grabbed a quick bite there on our trip to the Suqs.

I really am so bad at remembering to take photos. This is where the felafel used to be, before we dipped them in the lemon juice and gobbled them all up:

00Wherethe FelafelUsedToBe

here is what is left of the hummos:

00Hummos

And here is the traditional style ceiling with traditional style light fixtures:

00BeirutCeiling

August 16, 2009 - Posted by | Adventure, Cross Cultural, Doha, Eating Out, Entertainment, ExPat Life, Food, Friends & Friendship, Living Conditions, Qatar, Women's Issues

6 Comments »

  1. Thanks 🙂

    Comment by Purgatory | August 16, 2009 | Reply

  2. LLOOLLL @ Purg!

    Comment by intlxpatr | August 16, 2009 | Reply

  3. “This is where the felafel used to be, before we dipped them in the lemon juice and gobbled them all up”
    tsk tsk patience is a virtue 😛 LOL !

    Comment by bloggermathai | August 16, 2009 | Reply

  4. I see your Qatari friends took you to breakfast at Soog Wajif .

    Comment by daggero | August 16, 2009 | Reply

  5. Mathai, you are right, but remembering is also a virtue! I just forget, when the food arrives! I have got to start getting serious about this!

    Daggero, Yep, but these were Filistiniyya.

    Comment by intlxpatr | August 17, 2009 | Reply

  6. […] and I are getting together next weekend; if only we could have breakfast once again together at the Beirut. We truly enjoyed our years in […]

    Pingback by Qatar, the Magical Kingdom « Here There and Everywhere | January 17, 2012 | Reply


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