Here There and Everywhere

Expat wanderer

Pomegranate May Fight MRSA?

I found this article on AOL Health News and I am delighted to have any excuse to buy and eat a pomegranate. Now, even more so.

You may think I am overly concerned about MRSA, but I am convinced that it was MRSA that ended up killing my father. He was old, yes, but amazingly resilient and sturdy. He had a fighting spirit, and no matter what happened, he took control of his own “wellness.”

He went in for a routine operation (although few operations are ‘routine’ at 87) and ended up with a horrible infection where his IV had been inserted, an infection that wasn’t caught for about a week. He complained; people thought he was exaggerating. Eventually it was diagnosed as MRSA. He had to go through several rounds of intravenous Vancomycin, each of which lasted 30 days, and, I am convinced, none of which got rid of the infection because a month or so later, it would be roaring back.

What are we doing to ourselves? Antibiotic resistant bacteria are a result of over reliance on antibiotics, and for what? For viral diseases which cannot be cured by an antibiotic!

Eat more pomegranates!

By Katherine Tweed

Stopping the superbug methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) has researchers looking for new antibacterial agents in all corners of the globe. Not only are these bacteria difficult treat due to resistance to certain antibiotics, they are especially dangerous because they can be transmitted via casual contact. Scientists at the University of Kingston, Surrey in the UK have found there is promise in pomegranates.

Pomegranates have long been known for their antibacterial and therapeutic health benefits, especially in Brazil. While most of us think of pomegranates as being chock-full of antioxidants, they may fight more than free radicals. A study published in BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine found that when the fruit’s rind is combined with metal salts and vitamin C, they hold promise in killing MRSA.

“It was the mix that fantastically increased the activity — there was synergy, where the combined effects were much greater than those exhibited by individual components,” study author Declan Naughton told the Daily Mail. “It shows nature still has a few tricks up its sleeve.”

Drug-resistant staph infections such as MRSA are a growing problem, primarily in hospital settings. MRSA infections accounted for two percent of staph infections in U.S. hospitals in 1974, but that figure jumped to 63 percent in 2004, according to the CDC.

Don’t reach for the pomegranate lotion just yet, however. The research was done in a lab setting, and it is still in the preliminary stages. Also, pomegranate rind on its own was not able to stop or slow the growth of drug-resistant staph infections. The authors say that while there is potential for pomegranates enhanced with metal salts, further investigation is needed.

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January 6, 2010 - Posted by | Aging, Experiment, Food, Health Issues, Hygiene, Living Conditions

8 Comments »

  1. I love pomegranate and pomegranate juice!

    Comment by Polar Panda | January 6, 2010 | Reply

  2. honestly i didnt know much abt MRSA… O_O!!!sorry to hear abt ur dad!!
    Pomegranate ..funny thing abt it was as a kid i always tried to spit the seed out ..n i dunno y..

    Comment by BNDQ8 | January 6, 2010 | Reply

  3. Polar Panda – Me too! It’s like a miracle now that there are all these juices all made, and you don’t have to peel the pomegranate and put all the seeds in a blender or processor, and then strain them, to get the juice. How can anything that tastes so good be so good for you? 😀

    I don’t like the seeds, either, BNDQ8. I think they are sour or bitter. And my Dad was old, but MRSA robbed him of months and of quality-of-life. I am mad at MRSA!

    Comment by intlxpatr | January 6, 2010 | Reply

  4. I went a corporate nutrition Lunch & Learn session years ago. Here is the “Power Food” she listed:

    1.Pamogranite (or juice)
    2.Almond (I use almond butter on toast)
    3.Tomatoes
    4.Quiwa (a kind of ancient grain – I mixed it with multi-grain and race by rice cooker)
    5.Carrots
    6.Yam
    7.Broclie
    8.Whole grains
    9. – 10. Forgot

    I think if we eat balanced food, we do not need multi-vitamins, except Vitamin D in the north when people do not see sun often. I’ve been following this list and found our family’s general health is getting better.

    8 – 10. Forgot

    Comment by Polar Panda | January 7, 2010 | Reply

  5. Thanks for this. My mother contracted MRSA in hospital 2 years ago and it has been plaguing her ever since. I got Yemeni sidra honey for her when I was in Qatar, as I heard that it was helpful and now I have access to NZ Manuka honey, which has been proven to be effective in killing the superbug. But yummmm… pomegranate juice? Even better!

    Comment by Sheila | January 7, 2010 | Reply

  6. Polar – all those foods are rich and good for you. Nine and ten may have been something like walnuts/almonds and salmon. Have you read that they discovered the juice and seeds of the tomato are especially good for you? No more throwing them away; use them in your spaghetti sauce!

    Sheila – I learned about the Yemeni cidre honey last time I was in Doha and a friend who had twins sent me there for the special honey, with bee jelly and pollen added in. She said it was only this honey that got her through her twins infancy! Women in the show, thinking the honey was for me, told me I was going to make my husband very happy (!) that it is also good for sexual energy, LOL. I am a believer – I use it when I start to get a cold, with lemon juice, in hot tea. It is wonderful!

    Comment by intlxpatr | January 7, 2010 | Reply

  7. what are the antibiotics in maldives?

    Comment by shaufa waheedh | August 26, 2010 | Reply

  8. Shaufa – I am sorry, I have no idea. This is not about antibiotics, but about naturally occuring substances in foods that fight infection.

    Comment by intlxpatr | August 26, 2010 | Reply


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