Here There and Everywhere

Expat wanderer

Presenter Ses Condoléances

Some things you do. Some things are hard, and you do them anyway. I always think of them in the formal – pour prendre conge’, respondez, pour rendre petite assistance . . . must do’s, societal niceties, the grease that keeps civilization running, never mind smoothly.

I had to call a friend this morning to tell her how sorry I am that her husband had died. When she came to the phone, I was initially shocked. For months, since her husband’s stroke, she has been subdued and tired, but this morning she sounded happy and energetic.

“He’s free!” she said to me. “”As it says in the Bible, his passing was a breath; if I hadn’t been holding his hand and paying attention, I wouldn’t have known he was gone. It was so easy.” She was joyful. We wept together, for joy. He was free of the burden his life had become.

What I thought was going to be a sad call turned out to be a joyful call. She loves her husband still. They had years and years and children and grandchildren together, and she let him go with joy because he was ready.

Thanks be to God.

September 7, 2013 Posted by | Aging, Circle of Life and Death, Civility, Community, Cultural, ExPat Life, Family Issues, Friends & Friendship | 2 Comments

Driftwood Inn, Homer, Room 26 and Cabin

Homer greets us with a beautiful sunrise over the beach, and we can’t wait to get started.

00HomerBeachSunriseFromCabin

This was such a lovely place to spend some time. It didn’t hurt that from the time we left Kodiak, the weather has been gorgeous. Gorgeous is not something you can count on in Alaska. It was nice having a break from the boat, being on our own to explore, and having such a beautiful view to write notes while I did the laundry.

What was so totally cool is that while you do have to pay for the washer and the dryer, and I don’t mind that, it’s only fair, the management provides a big jar of detergent.

Have you ever been traveling and wanted to do laundry only to realize you needed to go buy some detergent, or to have change to use those machines that distribute detergent, but sometimes don’t work when you need them to? What an annoyance! I so appreciated their providing detergent; it may seem like a small thing, but it made doing the laundry so easy.

Cold country dressing is so totally different from warm weather dressing. In warm weather, you really have to do a lot more laundry, sweat makes clothes need washing more often. In cold weather, unless it is rainy, you can end up wearing the same outer clothes multiple times before they need washing. Most of what we needed to wash was socks and underwear, but also my favorite jeans and t-shirts. I had others, but you know how it is, you have your favorites 🙂

Our room, #26 upstairs in a cabin separate from the Driftwood Inn but a part of it.
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View from balcony:
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Living and reading room
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noticeboard prompting us to look for resident eagle
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Stairway going up to our room (note antlers!)
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Washer and dryer – and detergent!
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view from downstairs
00DownstairsAreaAndView

full kitchen area and dining available for use
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As promised, eagle on turret 🙂
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Eagle totally unfazed by our photo-taking 🙂
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September 7, 2013 Posted by | Adventure, Alaska, Arts & Handicrafts, Beauty, Cultural, Customer Service, ExPat Life, Hotels, Living Conditions, Privacy, Road Trips, Travel, Weather | , , | Leave a comment