Here There and Everywhere

Expat wanderer

On Being a Sick Person

You really don’t want to be around me. Not because I’m still contagious, I don’t know whether I am or not. You don’t want to be around me because I am really grumpy.

I’m supposed to be in Seattle. We had a plan, and we had all the pieces in place. We had tickets, hotel reservations and a rental car waiting for us.

A couple days before the trip, I felt a tickle in the back of my throat. “Oh, allergies!” I said, because everyone has allergies at this time of the year. While in other parts of the country, things may start to die off in late August, in Pensacola, even in the middle of daily 90 degree temperatures, the light begins to change, and the plants send forth new growth. I had a grand new crop of hydrangeas, thanks to s week of daily thunderstorms and deluges, and our tomatoes are beginning to set once again.

The tickle progressed to a sore throat, and the day before we were set to leave, I awoke truly, totally sick. The full spectrum of unlovely symptoms. AdventureMan and I looked at each other and he said “Sweetie, we really can’t go,” (he knows that I tend to ignore illness and soldier on if I can) and I surprised him by saying “I know.”

My Father was raised Christian Scientist, an increasingly obscure subset of peculiarly American Christian sects. Christian Scientists (I may get this a little wrong) believe in Truth and Error, and illness is seen as an Error in thinking. We didn’t practice Christian Science as I was growing up, but it left an influence; illness in my mind is something to be ignored when possible and overcome as quickly as possible.

So when I am really really sick, I take it very personally. This respiratory whatever flattened me, the deep coughing leaves me aching and weak, and even when the thick head and constant sleeping part left me, I am not able to resume my active life, I am tired.

I am feeling better, and I am not yet well. I am well enough to be grumpy. My attention level is low and my energy level is lower. Poor AdventureMan! I am a terrible patient! I am an IMPatient!

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August 27, 2016 Posted by | Civility, Family Issues, Health Issues, Quality of Life Issues, Relationships, Travel | 2 Comments

Exalt v. Exult

It’s a wonderful world we live in, where, in the midst of doing my Lectionary readings, I can at a moment ask this wonderful machine with its access to collective knowledge: “When do you use exalt and when do you use exult?”

They sound so alike, don’t they?

And a wonderful website, Grammarist, gives me this answer:

Exalt vs. exult

To exalt is to raise in rank, to glorify, or to increase the effect or intensity of. In all its definitions, exalt is transitive, meaning it takes a direct object (i.e., you can’t just exalt, period; you have to exalt someone or something). The word’s past participle, exalted, is often used to mean elevated in rank or lofty

To exult is to rejoice greatly or to be jubilant or triumphant. It is always intransitive, meaning it does not have a direct object (i.e., you can’t exult someone or something; you just exult). The most common derivative of exult is the adjective exultant, which means marked by great joy or jubilation.

In spoken language, that one little vowel probably doesn’t make that much difference, but in written language, if you know the difference (I now do, and so do you!) it could be glaring. So I will no longer write “exaltations!” but “Exultations!” when I am expressing enormous joy.

And now, back to my Lectionary readings, which start with Psalms; here is the Psalm that interrupted my readings in search of the above. I will share it with you. I love that the author uses both exalt and exult in the same Psalm. Can you spot them?

21 Domine, in virtute tua

1 The king rejoices in your strength, O Lord; *
how greatly he exults in your victory!

2 You have given him his heart’s desire; *
you have not denied him the request of his lips.

3 For you meet him with blessings of prosperity, *
and set a crown of fine gold upon his head.

4 He asked you for life, and you gave it to him: *
length of days, for ever and ever.

5 His honor is great, because of your victory; *
splendor and majesty have you bestowed upon him.

6 For you will give him everlasting felicity *
and will make him glad with the joy of your presence.

7 For the king puts his trust in the Lord; *
because of the loving-kindness of the Most High, he
will not fall.

(8 Your hand will lay hold upon all your enemies; *
your right hand will seize all those who hate you.

9 You will make them like a fiery furnace *
at the time of your appearing, O Lord;

10 You will swallow them up in your wrath, *
and fire shall consume them.

11 You will destroy their offspring from the land *
and their descendants from among the peoples of the earth.

12 Though they intend evil against you
and devise wicked schemes, *
yet they shall not prevail.

13 For you will put them to flight *
and aim your arrows at them.

14 Be exalted, O Lord, in your might; *
we will sing and praise your power.)

August 27, 2016 Posted by | Lectionary Readings, Words | , | Leave a comment